Press releases

Learn the basic principles of Wildlife First Aid. Learn how you can better help when you find a wildlife casualty.

Learn the basic principles of Wildlife First Aid. Learn how you can better help when you find wildlife casualty. The course is divided into three 90-120 minute sessions which take place as either a series of three evening courses or one full day course, with PowerPoint presentations showing videos and photos plus a few practical tasks.

Session 1) Background, Health & Safety and Basic First Aid Practices and Principles.
Session 2) Wild Bird Rescue plus Amphibian & Reptile Rescue.
Session 3) Wild Mammal Rescue. » Read more

Rescuers from East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) were called at 11am on 9th September 2019 to a badger which had fallen into the basement of a flat in Magdalen Road Hastings.

On arrival rescuers found the young badger at the bottom of the basement unable to climb out.   Rescuer Trevor Weeks MBE founder of East Sussex WRAS climbed down into the basement armed with a large blanket, dog grasper and badger cage. » Read more

Care Staff at East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) are asking members of the public who find poorly wild birds with ticks on them to seek urgent help in order to help save the birds lives.

“Ticks on birds can be fatal if left alone” said Trevor Weeks MBE founder of WRAS, “mammals cope much better than birds which need urgent veterinary help to both remove safely the ticks but also more importantly to get the right medication in order to treat the effects of the tick bite.” » Read more

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) were called out by members of the public to Eastbourne Seafront yesterday afternoon around 4pm.

A young seal just over 1 metre in length was spotted on the beach by the Western Lawns with blood on its coat.

Rescuers arrived on scene to find a crowd of people watching the seal. Lifeguards were also in attendance ensuring people did not get too close.

Experienced Marine Mammal Medics Trevor Weeks and Chris Riddington walked down onto the beach and positioned themselves between the seal and water blocking the seal’s escape route. The then approach the seal swiftly catching it. Trevor pinned the seal to the floor whilst Chris checked over the rear of the animal and Trevor checked over the front.

There were numerous punctures wounds around the muzzle and to the flippers which were not fresh and also infected. Some of the wounds were bleeding too.  The seal was lifted and carried back to the waiting veterinary ambulance.

The seal was take back to WRAS's Veterinary Hospital where the wounds were cleaned up before being transported to the RSPCA Mallydams Wood centre at Hastings where they have specialist seal facilities.

It is hoped that the seal will make a complete recovery in due course.

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Press Contacts: Trevor Weeks & Chris Riddigton 01825-873003

THIS VIDEO IS FREE FOR USE BY LOCAL BBC NEWS AND ITV NEWS, AS WELL AS BY LOCAL NEWSPAPERS AND RADIO STATIONS TO EAST SUSSEX UK, FOR ALL OTHER USE PLEASE CONTACT EAST SUSSEX WRAS.

An Eastbourne man has completed one of the hardest races in the England, the Race to the Stones. The 100km non stop race started on Saturday morning at 8:30am. It follows the ancient Ridgeway track finishing at the famous standing stones at Avebury.

Chris Riddington, Lead Casualty Manager at East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS), was undertaking the race to raise money for the charity who he has dedicated the last 7 years of his life to.

Walking, running, constantly moving along he completed the route in 17 hours 56 minutes and 52 seconds finishing just before 2:30am Sunday morning.

“It was one if the hardest and amazing challenge that I have ever set myself to achieve” said Chris,

“When I finally got to stones it was quite emotional, 100k was in the bag and the finish was in sight. It was a euphoric experience at 2.30am in the morning after being awake for 18 hours of running.”

“The sun set was one of the most beautiful I had seen. The colours were changing every km I went along and it really lifted my spirits as I imagined ancient Kings and Queens travelling this historic route”

The race was not without its problems and the day time temperatures reach 30 degrees.

“The heat really made it difficult to stay hydrate and run properly without over doing it. It was beaming down from early morning all the way through until the evening. When the sun set and it cooled down it as amazing” said Chris.

Chris’s partner Laura Carrick had been meeting him at the check points along the route and was there for an emotional finish at Avebury.

However Chris’s race to the stones suddenly turned into a race to the hospital, when once back at their hotel Chris passed out in the car park resulting in a paramedic car and ambulance attending to him.

“Sadly I struggled to hydrate and ended up collapsing after the race. A scary point after a massive high of finishing the race. It changed rapidly and I was taken into hospital by ambulance and put on a IV drip at 3.30am Sunday morning.  I was given three bags of IV fluids at Basingstoke Hospital over the next 10 hours before being discharged in the afternoon” said Chris.

Chris is now at home in Eastbourne recovering and is hoped to be back on duty at the Rescue Centre on Tuesday.

The fundraising total stood at over £2050 on Monday morning with donations via Just Giving and facebook.  Donations can still be made at https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/christopher-wras1 or https://www.facebook.com/donate/1881241128835299/.

WRAS founder Trevor Weeks MBE said “I feel so humble that my best mate would put himself through such endurance and exhaustion for a charity I started and believe so much in. I am so proud of him and Laura for supporting him and keeping us updated throughout the day. What an amazing achievement and we are all wishing him a speedy recover, the animals need him too much.”

 

A hedgehog found himself in a hole lot of bother yesterday (Monday 2nd July) after falling into a pipe close to the junction of Mill Road and String Walk Hailsham.

The hedgehog is thought to have fallen into the pipe during the night and spent all day curled up in the pipe till observant walkers noticed the hedgehog in its predicament.

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) were called out just before 6pm last night to rescue the hedgehog.

WRAS founder Trevor Weeks MBE attended on site to find the hedgehog about 2ft down inside the pipe.  "The hedgehog was not exactly small and filled the pipe. There wasn't any room for me to get my hands in to lift the hedgehog up so I had to use a dog grasper to try and free the hedgehog" said Trevor.

It took Trevor three attempt to get the hedgehog out and Trevor had to use a crowbar to help get the loop of the dog grasper in place properly.

"I was so relived once I had the loop in place and I could lift the hedgehog to safety" said Trevor, "the hedgehog was a boy and a good size and shape but I decided to bring him in for observations after being in the sun for most of the day."

East Sussex WRAS is urging people to keep an eye out for pipes, drains and holes which are uncovers and to call the council or relevant authority to ensure drain covers or replaced and repaired as soon as possible.  If anyone sees a hedgehog or other creature trapped in a hole they should call East Sussex WRAS on 07815-078234.

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This video is free to use by local media to East Sussex, England i.e. local BBC News, ITV Meridian, Local radio stations and local Newspapers. For all other use please conatct Caters News. To license or use in a commercial player please contact info@catersnews.com or call +44 121 616 1100 / +1 646 380 1615

A man from Sussex is will be undertaking one of the toughest 100 kilometre non-stop runs in the country to raise money for local wildlife.

Chris Riddington, 33 from Eastbourne, who is the Lead Casualty Manager at East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) will be attempting to run the 100k Race to the Stones, one of the toughest runs in the country.

The race will take place on 14th & 15th July and journeys from the Chilterns to the mystical North Wessex Downs past mighty iron age forts, ancient monuments and through some of Britain’s most stunning landscapes following the Ridgeway.  The Ridgeway is recognised as the oldest path in the UK. Along it’s length you will find traces of generations stretching back over 5,000 years. It is lined with Bronze Age hill forts, neolithic burial chambers and Roman river crossings, culminating in the largest neolithic stone circle in Europe.

Chris joined East Sussex WRAS in 2011 as a volunteer but is now the Lead Casualty Manager working for WRAS.   Although Chris is paid minimum wage for 36 hours a week to work at the Casualty Centre he also volunteers his time as the Duty Rescue Co-ordinator working up to 110 hours a week.

“WRAS is my passion, its my life and its made a huge change in my life. Joining WRAS was one of the best decisions I’ve made. It can get very stressful and tiring at times, and when an animal dies it is really tough, but on the other hand I work with some amazingly dedicated and talented people, and to see so many casualties going back to the wild is awesome” explained Chris, “I see how much WRAS struggles to cope with the workload, and the high demand of their service which is being stretched to its limits, so I would like to raise some extra funds to help the charity keep its life saving work on the road helping the people and wildlife of Sussex.”

Chris Riddington has undertaken the Ultra Marathon “Race to the Kings” between Arundel and Winchester and as well as the Beachy Head Marathon as well as other challenges but this is the longest and most challenging route yet. “This route is very hilly, and I’m going to need as many people as possible to encourage me and keep me going by donating as much as they can afford. I would love to be able to raise enough money to buy another incubator for WRAS’s Orphan Room” said Chris.

At the end of last week WRAS had in its care over 330 casualties, the highest number ever:

10 Rabbits

1 Greater Spotted Wood Pecker

1Mouse

10 Foxes

2 Kestrels

7 Tawny Owls

1 Chaffinch

1 Bullfinch

17 Sparrows

15 Great Tits

18 Jackdaws

14 Crows

8 Magpies

5 Swallows

1 Badger

1 Gosling

24 Blackbirds

44 Blue Tits

13 Starlings

8 Dunnocks

12 Robins

2 Gulls

14 Ducks

1 Warbler

36 Hedgehogs

21 Wood Pigeons

2 Collared Doves

43 Feral Pigeons

East Sussex WRAS was established as a voluntary group by WRAS founder Trevor Weeks MBE in 1996, and became a registered charity in 2005. The charity has grown from a one man band to an award winning community charity helping thousands of people and over 3200 casualties a year with its 6 Veterinary Ambulances and its registered Veterinary Hospital in the heart of East Sussex.

Please sponsor him either

text RTTS58 then the amount eg £5 to 70070

OR via Just giving

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/christopher-wras1

WRAS would like to thank Martlets Builders and Birdchwood Motor Group for their sponsorship of the event too.

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Birds are nesting at this time of year, they are protected by law and all nesting birds, eggs, young cannot be disturbed, taken or killed unless under licence from Natural England. Installation of solar panels, television aerials, roof extensions, building demolition or other non-essential works are not a valid reason for disturbing the nests, eggs or young. If you need to undertake urgent works to a roof due to a leak which could cause structural damaged etc then a licen

ce is required in order to cause disturbance. Even Pest Control companies do not have an automatic right to disturb nesting birds and they can only use a general licence for a small group of birds, and one of the requirements of using a general licence is that alternatives and deterrence are tried first. Nests, eggs and young can’t be moved off roof tops because they are noisy, keeping you awake, pooing on a pavement, pooing on washing on a line and not for general maintenance either, except where public health and safety is at risk (this does not mean they can be moved for the safety of contractors working on the roof). Even Herring Gulls adults and young are protected and cannot be touched using a General Licence, although nests and eggs may be cleared under certain circumstances. Before clearly a nest it is advisable to speak to Natural England to ensure you are not breaking the law. Prevention is always better than cure, so once the nesting session is over it is advisable to get a builder in to erect a mesh frame over your chimney to stop birds nesting or using mesh or netting behind chimneys to prevent nests or scarecrow devices which will deter birds from nesting. » Read more

Our Casualty Centre is extremely busy at the moment, we are taking in as many casualties as we can. but are limited on the size and type of casualties we can take in. However this changes daily, as and when we are able to release casualties once better. We currently have over 330 casualties in care:
10 Rabbits
1 Greater Spotted Wood Pecker
1Mouse
10 Foxes

2 Kestrels
7 Tawny Owls
1 Chaffinch
1 Bullfinch
17 Sparrows
15 Great Tits
18 Jackdaws
14 Crows
8 Magpies
5 Swallows
1 Badger
1 Gosling
24 Blackbirds
44 Blue Tits
13 Starlings
8 Dunnocks
12 Robins
2 Gulls
14 Ducks
1 Warbler
36 Hedgehogs
21 Wood Pigeons
2 Collared Doves
43 Feral Pigeons » Read more